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Timeline of Government Secret Projects PART 3

2020.01.16 01:34 CuteBananaMuffin Timeline of Government Secret Projects PART 3

I had to break it down to 3 parts because the article is longer than 40,000 words
1979 (A) In February 1979, Alfred Hubbard attended an LSD reunion party hosted by Dr. Oscar Janiger along with Laura Huxley, Sidney Cohn, John Lilly, Willis Harman, and Timothy Leary among others (Lee and Schlain, 213). (B) Around 1979, SRI funded a project of Tart's which screened university students and faculty for psychic ability. (Schnabel, Jim, Remote Viewers: The Secret History of America's Psychic Spies, Dell, 1997, pg 225-6) (C) In an article entitled "The Fund for CIA Research, or Who's Disinforming Who?", the anonymous authors (the Associated Investigators Group) accuse Bruce Maccabee of working with the CIA, providing them with information, and letting the CIA affect his leadership in FUFOR. According to the article, Maccabee's main contact with the CIA was through Dr. Christopher Green. In a written response, Maccabee rebuts that most of his contacts with the CIA have been in the context of his work with the Navy and are unrelated to his UFO research. He says that he did give CIA employees informal lectures at the request of Ron Pandolfi, but that the CIA has never attempted to influence his research.
[A similar rebuttal was written by Aviary guy Dan Smith and Rosemary Ellen Guiley of Fate Magazine, and New Age Land Central - in later years - after similar accusations were made.] "I never contacted any companies. What I did was tell Jack Acuff - Director of NICAP at the time - that I would like to speak to experts in the field of radar. He, in turn, put me in contact with a scientist - Dr. Gordon MacDonald - at the MITRE corporation. I was invited to discuss the NZ sightings with him and several other scientists at MITRE in McLean, VA.
And I did (and they generally agreed with my conclusions). Then a week-or-so later, I learned that MacDonald had contacted a man at the CIA who contacted me and offered to provide technical consultation if I would provide a briefing to some CIA employees. At first, I was leery of doing anything with the CIA. But I knew they had radar experts, so I stipulated that if they would give me some feedback I'd tell them what I know.
So I briefed them and I received some helpful comments..." [note: When you dance with the Devil, the Devil doesn't change - the Devil changes YOU!] "After I discussed the NZ case one employee - Dr. Christopher "Kit" Green (KG) - invited me to visit the CIA again a week-or-so later to have a general UFO discussion with him and a couple of other employees... After that last meeting with KG in the spring of 1979, I didn't see him again and had no contact with the agency until June, 1984 when I was contacted by Dr. Ronald Pandolfi regarding my Navy work.
He had been tracking developments by the "other side" in that field of research and wanted to know what the U.S. state-of-the-art was." (Bruce Maccabee's response to the AIR report) Formerly with the CIA, Dr. Green's work involved UFO research. "Dr. Green attained a Ph.D. in Neurophysiology in 1969 and in1976 received his M.D. (Doctor of Medicine) degree. Green was awarded the CIA's National Intelligence Medal for his work on a 'classified project' from 1979 to 1983 - precisely the years in which Maccabee was meeting with him at CIA headquarters.
Green uses somewhat of a cover story to describe his CIA work, calling himself a 'Scientific Advisor on the Advisory Board to the Directorate of Intelligence, CIA.'" (The Associated Investigators Group, "The Fund for CIA Research, or Who's Disinforming Who?") Esalen also held seminars in quantum physics, and was the birthplace of the Physics/Consciousness Research Group. Some results of these seminars are documented in Zukav, Gary, The Dancing Wu Li Masters, Morrow Quill, 1979
1980 (A) By the 1980's, Koslov was working with the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University, where he continued to study the effects of electromagnetic radiation on humans. He is currently the vice president of the Maryland Microscopical and Scientific Instrument Society. (B) Dale Graff had continued to task SRI on behalf of the Air Force for the next few years. In 1980, he won a fellowship for "exceptional analyst" within the intelligence community and planned to take 2 years off to conduct research in other laboratories: SRI, a psychokenesis lab at Princeton, a J.B. Rhine affiliated lab in Durham, NC, and a Department of Energy lab where microwave weapons were being studied. His fellowship was revoked by the office of the Air Force Chief of Staff and - with the encouragement of Jack Vorona - he retired from the Air Force and moved to the DIA, where he ran the Advanced Concepts Office. (C) "Michelle Smith" and Lawrence Pazder published "Michelle Remembers" about Satanic Ritual Abuse memories. She came to therapist Pazder because she was in distress over horrible dreams and a miscarriage.
1981 (A) Orbit Maneuvering System Part of the plan to build the SPS space platforms was the demand for reusable space shuttles since they could not afford to keep discarding rockets.
In 1981, The NASA Spacelab-3 mission of the Space Shuttle made "a series of passes over a network of 5 ground based observatories" in order to study what happened to the ionosphere when the Shuttle injected gases into it from the Orbit Maneuvering System (OMS). They discovered that they could "induce ionospheric holes" and began to experiment with holes made in the daytime or at night over Millstone, Connecticut and Arecibo, Puerto Rico.
They experimented with the effects of, "artificially induced ionospheric depletions on very low frequency wave lengths, on equatorial plasma instabilities, and on low frequency radio astronomical observations over Roberval, Quebec, Kwajelein, in the Marshall Islands, and Hobart, Tasmania" (Advanced Space Research, Vo1.8, No. 1, 1988). (B) Eldon Byrd - who worked for Naval Surface Weapons, Office of Non-Lethal Weapons - was commissioned in 1981 to develop electromagnetic devices for purposes including 'riot control', clandestine operations and hostage removal. "Byrd also wrote of experiments where behavior of animals was controlled by exposure to weak electromagnetic fields. 'At a certain frequency and power intensity, they could make the animal purr, lay down, and roll over.'" (Keeler, Anna, "Remote Mind Control Technology") "Between 1981 and September 1982, the Navy commissioned me to investigate the potential of developing electromagnetic devices that could be used as non-lethal weapons by the Marine Corp for the purpose of 'riot control', hostage removal, clandestine operations, and so on." Eldon Byrd, Naval Surface Weapons Center, Silver Spring MD. (from "Electromagnetic Pollution" by Kim Besly, p 12.) (C) John Alexander supported the views of Thomas Bearden. Delivered a paper to the 1981 national convention of the US Psychotronic Association (D) General Albert Stubblebine. Former head of the U.S. Army Intelligence & Security Command (INSCOM) 1981-84, Masters degree in chemical engineering from Columbia. He signed classified contracts with the Monroe Institute (Emerson, Steven, Secret Warriors, G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1988, pg 103-4). Stubblebine often met with Noriega while he was a U.S. intelligence asset (Emerson, 1988, pg 110-1).
Stubblebine was the former boss of Col. John Alexander, and the two have held numerous "spoon-bending" parties. He is a friend of Lyn Buchanan [according to a representative from PSI TECH, the two are not friends]. Stubblebine is married to ufologist Rima Laibow. (Porter, Tom, Government Research into ESP & Mind Control, March, 1996). Soon after becoming head of INSCOM, Stubblebine began a program called the "High Performance Task Force" - a series of methods to improve his officers' performance. These ranged from the neuro-linquistic programming of Tony Robbins to the hemisynch tapes of the Monroe Institute where Stubblebine often sent his officers. (Schnabel, Jim, Remote Viewers: The Secret History of America's Psychic Spies, Dell, 1997, pg 276) Following an incident involving an officer having a psychotic episode at the Monroe Institute, Stubblebine resigned in 1984. He was replaced by Major General Harry Soyster (Schnabel, 1997, pg 316), formerly vice-president for 'Intelligence Systems' of BDM of McClean, Virginia. As of 1992, Chairman of PSI-TECH. "Laibow, Stubblebine, and ufologist Victoria Lacas (with [C.B. Scott] Jones in the shadows) toured Europe and the Soviet Union, where they have established a prodigious UFO/Psi network." (Durant, Robert J., "Will the Real Scott Jones Please Stand Up?") Stubblebine gave a lecture at the International Symposium on UFO Research - sponsored by the International Association for New Science - in Denver, Colorado (May 22-25, 1992).
This gives a good example of Stubblebine's coherence (or lack thereof) and paranoia (he often threatened to destroy the tape). Stubblebine claimed that none of the members of the remote-viewing program had prior psychic abilities or interests (but all other sources state that they did). (E) In the Summer of 1981, Pat Delgado brought to the attention of the national Press the existence of mysterious circular depressions in the fields at Cheesefoot Head, Hampshire. (F) Budd Hopkins published Missing Time with an afterward by therapist Aphrodite Clamar. Hopkins book was about the in-depth investigation of 19 cases of UFO abduction which he had undertaken in the previous 5 years. (G) The first cases of AIDS are confirmed in homosexual men in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco, triggering speculation that AIDS may have been introduced via the Hepatitis-B vaccine.
1982 (A) In May 1982, Elisabeth and Russell Targ held a workshop on psychic phenomena for 25 professionals.
This was part of a program with Stanislav Grof, who was studying non-chemical alternatives for altered states of consciousness. The Targs goal was to show that psychic experiences did not require an "altered state". (Targ, Russell and Harary, Keith, Mind Race, Villard Books, 1984, pg 99). Grof served briefly as the branch chief of the operational unit of Star Gate from around 1982 or 83 until he resigned in summer of 1993. (B) Electromagnetic weapons for law enforcement use in Great Britain. A 10-30 Hz strobe light which can produce seizures, giddiness, nausea, and fainting was developed by Charles Bovill of the now defunct British firm Allen International. Addition of sound pulses in the 4.0-7.5 Hz range increases effectiveness as utilized in the Valkyrie - a "frequency" weapon advertised in British Defense Equipment Catalogue until 1983.
The squawk box or "sound curdler" uses 2 loudspeakers of 350-watt output to emit 2 slightly different frequencies which combine in the ear to produce a shrill shrieking noise. The U.S. National Science Foundation report says there is "severe risk of permanent impairment of hearing." (From Electropollution by Kim Besley, citing the Manchester City Council Police Monitoring Unit document.) (C) Air Force review of biotechnology. "Currently available data allow the projection that specially generated radiofrequency radiation (RFR) fields may pose powerful and revolutionary antipersonnel military threats. Electroshock therapy indicates the ability of induced electric current to completely interrupt mental functioning for short periods of time to obtain cognition for longer periods and to restructure emotional response over prolonged intervals. "... impressed electromagnetic fields can be disruptive to purposeful behavior and may be capable of directing and/or interrogating such behavior. Further, the passage of approximately 100 milliamperes through the myocardium can lead to cardiac standstill and death, again pointing to a speed-of-light weapons effect. "A rapidly scanning RFR system could provide an effective stun or kill capability over a large area." (From "Final Report on Biotechnology Research Requirements for Aeronautical Systems Through the Year 2000". AFOSR-TR-82-0643, Vol 1, and Vol 2, July 30, 1982.)
1983 (A) Phoenix II / USAF, NSA: Location: Montauk, Long Island Electronic multi-directional targeting of select population groups Targeting: Medium range Frequencies: Radar, microwaves. EHF UHF modulated Power: Gigawatt through Terawatt Purpose: Loading of Earth Grids, planetary sonombulescence to stave off geological activity, specific-point earthquake creation, population programming for "sensitized" individuals Pseudonym: "Rainbow", ZAP(B) Nikolai Khokhlov - a Soviet KGB agent who defected to the West in 1976 - interviews recently arrived scientists and reports that "The Soviet mind-control program is run by the KGB with unlimited funds." (From The Spectator, Feb 5, 1983, reported in "New World Order Psychotronic Tyranny" by C. B. Baker.) (C) "Center Lane" was the codename for the operational unit of the remote-viewing program, redesignated from Grill Flame in late 1983. Control of the unit shifted from INSCOM's operation group to the more direct control of Albert Stubblebine. The unit was known as INSCOM Center Lane Project (ICLP). (Schnabel, Jim, Remote Viewers: The Secret History of America's Psychic Spies, Dell, 1997, pg 280) In late 1983, 4 more individuals were recruited to Center Lane: Captain Ed Dames, Captain Bill Ray (counterintelligence specialist), Captain Paul Smith, and Charlene Cavanaugh (civilian analyst with INSCOM). These four began a training program - which started at The Monroe Institute - and concluded with personal training with Ingo Swann. (Schnabel, 1997, pg 292-3) After Gen. Stubblebine's retirement in 1984, Center Lane was completely without support in the Army. Jack Vorona arranged for the unit to be transferred directly to the DIA's Scientific and Technical Intelligence Directorate when Army funding ran out in late 1985, at which time it was redesignated Sun Streak. Until that time, the unit was given no official taskings (Schnabel, 1997, pg 319). Center Lane started when Ingo Swann at SRI came across a breakthrough in his techniques in 1983. He developed a training program and trained 6 military officers (including Ed Dames) over a period of 6 months. After finishing the training in late 1983, the viewers returned and started applying their knowledge.
The unit was renamed 'Center Lane' with Dames as the operations and training officer. "Dames took a 'let's see what this baby can do' approach, replacing the unit's former intelligence collection methodology with the breakthrough technique." (Dames, Ed, "Ed Dames Sets the Record Straight") [Keep in mind that Dames is a major disinfo artist.]
1984 "USSR: New Beam Energy Possible?", possibly associated with early Soviet weather engineering efforts over the U.S. (from "Tesla's Electromagnetics and Its Soviet Weaponization" by T.E. Bearden.) According to former Reagan aide Barbara Honneger, "the fundamental reason for the increased interest [in psi research] is initial results coming out of laboratories in the United States and Canada that certain amplitude and frequency combinations of external electromagnetic radiation in the brain-wave frequency range are capable of bypassing the external sensory mechanism of organisms - including humans - and directly stimulating higher-level neuronal structures in the brain.
This electronic stimulation is known to produce mental changes at a distance, including hallucinations in various sensory modalities - particularly auditory." (McRae, Ronald, Mind Wars, St. Martin's Press, 1984, pg 136) The overlap between these 2 fields can be described as: Mis-identification: Some ELF mind-control studies have been discussed under the heading of "psychotronics". Many - myself included - don't agree with this label as there is no psychic component in the study of the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the central nervous system. Coincidental Findings: As in most scientific fields, research that is tangential for one project may be central to another. Navy studies in ELF communications included a portion on possible health effects. When these findings were revealed, the possibility of using ELF as a weapon arose and studies were continued in that direction. However, we can't say that all of the Navy's research into ELF radio was a front for mind-control as they have a definite interest in communication with their submarines. The same may be true for remote-viewing studies. Studies at SRI and elsewhere measured and analyzed subject's brain waves, and also studied the effects of ELF waves as a possible carrier for telepathic information. Tech-Enhanced Psi: Some studies - especially those involving dolphins - tried to use technology to enhance psychic phenomena. Most of this is pure bunk including most of the inventions I've seen created by the Russians and the US Psychotronic Association. Some of it resembles telepathy simulated by technology, such as the attempt to carry signals from dolphins to humans via the "Neurophone". This would seem to fit better under "Mis-identification". Cover: Remote-viewing - like UFOs - has been postulated by some researchers as being used as a "cover story" for covert mind-control experiments. This plan would convince the victims that the "voices" or sensory data they were unnaturally receiving was due to channeling, telepathy, or remote-viewing. It would also have the "high-weirdness" factor, which would preclude a serious treatment of the subject by the mainstream media. However, I'm hesitant to lump the entire spectrum of government interest in psi in this category. Cutting Edge: Both psychic ability and things like non-lethal weapons are considered to be on the "cutting edge" of military theory. This is an alternative explanation as to why individuals like John Alexander and David Morehouse are interested in both fields. The degree to which these crossovers apply to specific cases are dealt with individually, and to this subject as a whole in the conclusions.
1985 (A) Founded by Ed May, the Cognitive Sciences Laboratory was formed at SRI in 1985 and moved with May to SAIC. May and the Cognitive Sciences Laboratory are currently at a "small start-up research place called the Laboratories for Fundamental Research" (e-mail from Ed May, 8/7/96).
Joe McMoneagle is listed as a research associate. Other staff members include S. James, P. Spottiswoode, Earling DeGraff, Nevin D. Lantz, Philip Wasserman, Laura V. Faith, Ellen Messer, and Stephan A. Schwartz. "I (Dean Radin) took a leave of absence from Bell Labs in 1985 and spent that entire year at SRI International, working with Hal Puthoff and Ed May.
Since then, I spent about half my time in academia (Princeton, Edinburgh, UNLV) and half in industry (Contel Technology Center, GTE Labs). My academic research was exclusively on psi phenomena, and my industrial research included about 20% on psi. "I'm not in favor of developing or using psi for any military purposes. But unfortunately there are those in the World who would use psi as a weapon if they could.
Thus, I reluctantly suppose that R& D on psi for intelligence and possibly military purposes can be justified for defensive reasons. It would be naive to think that someone, somewhere is not working on this right now." (Interview with the RetroPsychoKinesis Project) (B) Since the early 1970s, Puthoff had been a part-time paid consultant to Bill Church regarding alternative fuel sources. At Puthoff's urging, Church developed a company (Jupiter Technologies) to research Zero-Point Energy. In the summer of 1985 after giving only 2 weeks notice, Puthoff left SRI to work for Church full time. (Schnabel, Jim, 1997, pg 323) (C) Women in the peace camps at Greenham Common began showing various medical symptoms believed to be caused by EM surveillance weapons beamed at them. (See "Zapping: The New Weapon of the Patriarchy", Resonance#13, pp 22-24. Research by Woody Blue.) (D) Innovative Shuttle Experiments An innovative use of the Space Shuttle to perform space physics experiments in Earth orbit was launched, using the OMS injections of gases to "cause a sudden depletion in the local plasma concentration - the creation of a so-called ionospheric hole". This artificially-induced plasma depletion can then be used to investigate other space phenomena, such as the growth of the plasma instabilities or the modification of radio propagation paths.
The 47 second OMS burn of July 29, 1985 produced the largest and most long-lived ionospheric hole to date, dumping some 830 kg of exhaust into the ionosphere at sunset. A 6-second, 68-km OMS release above Connecticut in August 1985 produced an airglow which covered over 400,000 square km. During the 1980s, rocket launches globally numbered about 500-to-600 a year, peaking at 1500 in 1989. There were many more during the Gulf War. The Shuttle is the largest of the solid fuel rockets with twin 45-meter boosters. All solid fuel rockets release large amounts of hydrochloric acid in their exhaust.
Each Shuttle flight injects about 75 tons of ozone-destroying chlorine into the stratosphere. Those launched since 1992 inject even more ozone-destroying chlorine (about 187 tons) into the stratosphere (which contains the ozone layer). (E) Whitley Strieber publishes Communion. (F) According to the journal Science (227:173-177), HTLV and VISNA - a fatal sheep virus - are very similar, indicating a close taxonomic and evolutionary relationship.
1986 (A) Attorney General's Conference on Less Than Lethal Weapons Reviews current weapons available. Most date back to 1972: the Taser; the Nova XR-5000 Stun Gun (can interrupt a pacemaker); the Talon, a glove with an electrical pulse generator; and the Source, a flashlight with electrodes at the base.
These devices are useful only at close range except for the Taser, and are generally restricted to correctional institutions. Photic driving strobe lights tested by one conference delegate on 100 subjects produced discomfort. Closed eyelids do not block the effect. Evidence that ELF produces nausea and disorientation. Suggestion to develop fast-acting electro sleep-inducing EM weapon. Discusses problem of testing weapons on animals and human "volunteers".
(From "Report on the Attorney General's Conference on Less Than Lethal Weapons", by Sherry Sweetman, March 1987, prepared for the National Institute of Justice. Research by Harlan Girard.) (B) "The Electromagnetic Spectrum in Low-Intensity Conflict" by Captain Paul Tyler, MC, USN quotes the above passage and further elaborates on the theme. (Published in Low Intensity Conflict and Modern Technology, Lt. Col. David J. Dean, USAF, ed., Air University Press, Maxwell AFB, AL. Research by Harlan Girard.) (C) On 02/10/86, Cleve Backster's lab was visited by National Research Council's Committee on Techniques for the Enhancement of Human Performance. The NRC was evaluating enhancement and parapsychological studies conducted for the Army. So it is likely that Backster's research was involved with the Government. (National Research Council, Enhancing Human Performance, National Academy of Sciences, 1988, pg 193-8) (D) Mighty Oaks In April 1986 just before the Chernobyl disaster, the U.S. had a failed hydrogen test at the Nevada Test Site called "Mighty Oaks". This test - conducted far underground - consisted of a hydrogen bomb explosion in one chamber with a leaded steel door to the chamber (2 meters thick) closing within milliseconds of the blast.
The door was to allow only the first radioactive beam to escape into the "control room" in which expensive instrumentation was located. The radiation was to be captured as a weapon beam. The door failed to close as quickly as planned, causing the radioactive gases and debris to fill the control room and destroying millions of dollars worth of equipment. The experiment was part of a program to develop X-ray and particle beam weapons.
The radioactive releases from Mighty Oaks were vented under a "licensed venting" and were likely responsible for many of the North American nuclear fallout reports in May 1986, which were attributed to the Chernobyl disaster. (E) According to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (83:4007-4011), HIV and VISNA are highly similar and share all structural elements except for a small segment which is nearly identical to HTLV. This leads to speculation that HTLV and VISNA may have been linked to produce a new retrovirus to which no natural immunity exists. (F) A report to Congress reveals that the U.S. Government's current generation of biological agents includes modified viruses, naturally occurring toxins, and agents that are altered through genetic engineering to change immunological character and prevent treatment by all existing vaccines.
1987 (A) In 1987, Pandolfi invited UFOlogist Bruce Maccabee "to give a general lecture to [CIA] employees on UFOs and MJ-12". (Maccabee's response to AIR) (B) Department of Defense admits that despite a treaty banning research and development of biological agents, it continues to operate research facilities at 127 facilities and universities around the Nation.
1988 (A) After retiring from the Army in 1988, John Alexander joined the Los Alamos National Laboratories and began working with Janet Morris, the Research Director of the U.S. Global Strategy Council (USGSC) chaired by Dr Ray Cline (deceased) former Deputy Director of the CIA." (B) The Pentagon is ordered by courts to cease EMP tests at several locations due to a lawsuit filed by an environmental group. (From The Washington Post, May 15, 1988, see "US and Soviets Develop Death Ray", Resonance 11, p 10. Research by Remy Chevalier.) (C) Senator Claiborne Pell from Rhode Island. Member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Club of Rome. Decorated by the Knights of Malta. Along with Charlie Rose, Pell is one of Washington's biggest supporters of psychic research. In1988, he introduced a bill to get government funding for the New Age group the National Committee on Human Resources (Al Gore was a co-sponsor). He is also on the advisory board of the International Association of Near-Death Studies and on the board of the Institute of Noetic Sciences and the Human Potential Foundation. For 7 years, Claiborne Pell employed C.B. Scott Jones as an aide (Gardner, Martin, "Clairborne Pell: The Senator From Outer Space", Skeptical Inquirer, March/April 1996). Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. Pell was a close friend of BCCI figure Clark Clifford. (Truell, Peter and Gurwin, Larry, False Profits, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1992, pg 240)
1989 (A) MUFON appointed C.B. Scott Jones as a Special Consultant in International Relations (B) TRIDENT/ ONR, NSA: Electronic directed targeting of individuals or populations Targeting: Large population groups assembled Display: Black helicopters flying in triad formation of three Power: 100,000 watts Frequency: UHF Purpose: Large group management and behavior control, riot control Allied Agencies: FEMA Pseudonym: "Black Triad" A.E.M.C (C) Human Potential Foundation founder and president C.B. Scott Jones. Board members include Clark Sandground and Claiborne Pell. Received original funding from Laurance Rockefeller. Passes funds from Rockefeller to UFO abduction researcher John Mack. Worked with Dr. Igor Smirnov. (D) Michael Persinger feels that he is able to replicate alien abduction and other supernatural phenomena through the use of 3 solenoids (attached to a modified motorcycle helmet) passing a magnetic pulse through the frontal lobes of the brain. Solenoids are called "magnetic coils" by psychiatrists, who use them as a non-intrusive alternative to implantable electrodes for stimulating the brain. (see Hallett, Mark and Cohen, Leonardo, "Magnetism: a New Method for Stimulation of Nerve and Brain", JAMA, 7/28/89, pg 530) (E) John Alexander: "I have served as chief of Advanced Human Technology for the Army Intelligence and Security Command (1982-84) and - during the preparation of the EHP [Enhancing Human Performance] report - was director of the Advanced Systems Concepts Office at the U.S. Army Laboratory Command."
Alexander stated that "..psychotronic weapons lack traditional scientific documentation, and I do not suggest that research projects be carried out in that field." (Alexander, Col. John, "A Challenge to the Report", New Realities, March/April 1989) (F) Psi Tech founded in 1989 by president Ed Dames. Their vice-president is Jonina Dourif. A "John L. Turner" is listed as a monitor. Board Members include John B. Alexander and Gen. Albert Stubblebine.
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2019.10.22 05:41 ceetee15 Interview with Noel from Music Week

Three years ago, Noel Gallagher returned to the scene of the crime.
With the 20th anniversary of Oasis’ infamous third LP Be Here Now on the horizon, the legendarily sardonic singer-songwriter revisited its lead single, D’You Know What I Mean? Unleashed on a mad-for-it world in the summer of ’97, the track would mark the beginning of the end of the band’s glory days.
Arriving at the height of Oasis-mania, following the gargantuan success of 1995’s (What’s The Story) Morning Glory (4,565,844 sales, OCC), the song inevitably shot straight to No.1 in the UK and remains one of the group’s best-selling singles, having moved 846,453 units. But its epic length (the album version clocked in at a whopping seven minutes, 42 seconds) and overblown production set the tone for a campaign characterised more by excess than top tunes, and triggered alarm bells behind the scenes.
“I’d been asked to go to the playback meeting,” recalls Gallagher, speaking to Music Week. “There were people around the table from all over the world and, as they put [the record] on, I noticed at least half a dozen of them start stopwatches – that pissed me off.”
He continues: “The first minute is feedback, the drums don’t come in for a minute-and-a-half and the singing doesn’t come in for three minutes. There were people who were horrified. As it finished, there was another minute of feedback. There was silence and then someone said, ‘Will there be an edit?’ I just said, ‘No’.”
Gallagher trimmed 20 seconds off D’You Know What I Mean? for its 2016 remix, and considers the revised cut a significant improvement on the original.
“Well, it wasn’t mixed on cocaine,” he laughs. “I remember being high as fuck in the studio. I was 30 at the time, it was fucking mad.”
That the album was greeted with rave reviews and record first-week sales, before the sobering reality kicked in, is now part of rock‘n’roll mythology. Sales stalled at 1,933,564 and Oasis, on the cusp of becoming the biggest band on the entire planet, never quite scaled the same heights again. Regrets? He’s had a few...
“Before we started to play it live, I was absolutely convinced it was the greatest thing that had ever been thought of,” admits Gallagher. “It was only after about four or five gigs that I started thinking, ‘These songs are not moving anybody’ – and the people don’t lie.
“I don’t like that album. I missed the opportunity of doing something fucking great. And I’ve always thought maybe the songs are too long.”
It’s a pertinent point: nine of Be Here Now’s 12 tracks stretch past five minutes, while its third single All Around The World remains the longest No.1 in UK chart history at nine minutes, 38 seconds. Its contrast with recent Music Week data, showing the average length of a chart-topping hit in 2019 to be a mere 3:04, could not be more stark.
“Three minutes and four seconds?,” frowns Gallagher. “It’s a fucking joke. I struggle to get mine under four.
“I don’t like the way the industry dictates to the artist now. When I grew up, the artist dictated to the industry. Now, you get people crawling on their hands and knees to get a record deal. They’ll do whatever they’re told and it can be fucking no coincidence to anybody with half a brain cell that the quality of music is shrinking with every cycle.”
Oasis, of course, are now 10 years gone and confined to music history, barring an unlikely reconciliation. Gallagher, repped by longtime managers Marcus Russell and Alec McKinlay of Ignition and agent Ben Winchester of Primary Talent, is already eight years and three chart-topping albums into his solo career. The guitarist’s 2011 debut, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, has shifted 864,601 copies to date, 2015’s Chasing Yesterday 340,742 and 2017’s Who Built The Moon? 285,300, all released via his Sour Mash label.
“It’s been good,” he reflects, on the past near decade. “I’ve been through a few line-up changes already, which seems to be the thing that I do over the last 25 years. But I didn’t envisage doing the music I’m doing today when I started.”
Liberated by his work with producer David Holmes, Gallagher stepped out of his comfort zone on Who Built The Moon? and has continued to experiment on 2019 EPs Black Star Dancing and This Is The Place. A new single, Wandering Star, taken from the forthcoming Blue Moon Rising EP, will be released in early November, with the full extended play to follow early next year.
“Once I’d got the first record out of my system, which was a more standard Oasis-sounding record, I tried to push it out a little bit and see how far I can take what I do, which is why the EP thing appealed to me,” explains Gallagher. “It’s funny, when Black Star Dancing came out everyone was like, ‘Oh, is this the new direction?’ It’s like ‘No, it’s just a song, listen to it for what it is’. And then, with This Is The Place, ‘Oh, have you gone acid house?’ ‘No, it’s just a fucking song!’”
In comparison to Oasis’ impressive 13.3 million monthly Spotify listeners (their 2009 greatest hits compilation Time Flies... remains a fixture of the UK albums chart for this very reason), Gallagher’s solo material has garnered a more modest 1.5m, in part, due to the 52-year-old Mancunian’s uncompromising approach to the modern business. In the streaming age, where getting to the chorus within 30 seconds is positively encouraged, the verse to Black Star Dancing’s title track doesn’t commence until past the 50-second mark.
“If I was on a major record label I’d be being shoved in a certain direction,” offers Gallagher. “If I was on a major and I delivered Black Star Dancing, I guarantee it wouldn’t be put out as a single. I guarantee it.”
One of the finest tunesmiths of his generation, the Britpop great will be honoured with the BMI President’s Award at the BMI London Awards on October 21.
William Booth, EVP, chief operating officer at Gallagher’s publisher Sony/ATV UK, recalls first seeing Oasis with his then colleague Blair McDonald at the Canal Café bar during the 1993 In The City conference in Manchester.
“Signing Noel became mission critical for us as the new management team at the then recently revived Sony Music Publishing UK,” notes Booth. “Our instincts about his talents as a songwriter have been proven spectacularly correct as many of his songs have become anthems for a generation and he continues to prolifically write, tour and reach new audiences.
“We are very fortunate to have enjoyed being in business with Noel for all of these years and for everyone at Sony/ATV it is inconceivable that his songs should be anywhere else.”
Music Week meets with Gallagher in the central London office of BMI Awards publicist DawBell. While no subject is off limits, furthering the media obsession with his relationship with estranged brother Liam figures low on the agenda.
Here, Gallagher puts the music world to rights on streaming, songwriting and the state of today’s industry, and reveals what it would really take to reunite Oasis. Make no mistake, this is not a man mellowing in his middle age...
It’s a good few years since you criticised people for being happy to spend a tenner on two cups of coffee, but less willing to pay for music. Has your stance on streaming softened at all?
“Well, it sounds shit for a start. I’ve got the Spotify app on my phone but I’ve actually pressed the button to go on it maybe half a dozen times. I [get so] annoyed with the thing that comes up and says, ‘We think that you might like this’. I’m like, ‘Don’t fucking tell me what I might like!’ This little fucking tiny phone is telling me, ‘We made this playlist for you’ and I’m like, ‘You fucking arrogant little piece of fucking junk’. I don’t like that. I come at music from a different way: I want to find it, discover it, own it and I want it to live in my life forever. We’re all starting to get paid a bit better from [streaming] now, thank God for that, but it’s a hindrance as well because if you’re trying to get anything done, people will just look at how many streams you’ve got and, if it isn’t the magic number, they’ll dismiss it. The music that I’m making now, I even get told by my own record label, ‘It’s hard to pigeonhole this because there’s these playlists’. I’m like, ‘Fuck ’em all’. I don’t care, that’s just the way that my music is now. I’m not going to tailor it for a playlist, fuck that.”
Oasis have more monthly Spotify listeners than bands such as Arctic Monkeys, Foo Fighters and The 1975 – and you’ve been split up 10 years…
“I did hit on something as a songwriter that can never be repeated: the art of the universal truth. My songs are not personal to me, they’re not about me, they’re about it. And I think what separates them from the Arctic Monkeys, in particular, is that they are all very inclusive. Some of the Arctic Monkeys [songs] are a bit too cool for school and you’re not quite fucking sure what they’re about. I definitely hit on something in that first explosion of me as a songwriter and I wouldn’t try to over analyse it, other than that all of the lyrics are very inclusive and about our generation.”
Some of your best-loved songs are B-sides, so how do you feel about the death of the B-side?
“Well... the death of everything: 7”s, B-sides, venues, the charts, Top Of The Pops, record shops, you fucking name it. It’s a metaphor for life – all the old ways are dying gradually. The album will be next and then eventually the song, then there’ll just be fucking pop stars. Then they’ll die and there’ll just be emojis. Then they’ll fucking die and we’ll all be speaking Chinese.”
We’ll look forward to that. Did the supposed decline of the album influence your decision to release EPs?
“No, I was on tour and I felt Who Built The Moon? had run its course. I was having a meeting one afternoon and it was like, ‘What about putting some stuff out next year?’ And I thought it was a good idea. I just thought, ‘I don’t have to make an album so it doesn’t have to be an artistic signpost, there doesn’t have to be a huge campaign attached to it, let’s just do three EPs’. We’ve come to the point where I’m just like, ‘Who am I making music for now – me or other people?’ I’ve just been following my instincts and they’ve come out great. I’m actually thinking of issuing the title track off the next EP with a written apology because it’s so far removed from anything I was doing a year ago – far less what I did in Oasis – that it will split what’s left of my fanbase [laughs].”
What do you think about the speed of releases now? You see artists like Ariana Grande and Eminem putting out two albums only a few months apart…
“I’m not fucking bothered, they’re Americans anyway. But when I went solo I was offered – and continually get offered – pretty good deals from the majors. Every time I do an awards ceremony I get a queue of people saying, ‘Why are you on an indie?’ And you’re just like, ‘To be honest, all you can offer me is money and, frankly, I’ve got more money than you’. I wouldn’t want to be in the situation where a little 20-year-old A&R man is telling me what I should sound like, because I’d fucking gouge his eyes out, do you know what I mean? I didn’t want to try and do what I’d done in Oasis, what’s the point of that? Do it once, make it special, that’s it. That’s why we’ll never get back together. We did it once and it will remain iconic. Let’s go and do something else.”
Do you wish you’d gone solo sooner, then?
“It’s hard to say. I was first offered a solo deal after Knebworth [1996] and turned it down... No, I think these things happen when they happen. I think it was meant to happen for a reason. I can be a bit of a fatalist when it comes to things like that and I tend to follow my instincts. There were plenty of times when I could have left Oasis, but for some reason, the night that I did, something instinctively said, ‘Now’s the right time’.”
Strangely, you’ve yet to play Glastonbury as a solo artist…
“They’ve never made me an offer I couldn’t refuse! But I do like going. I go most years so to play it would be a ball-ache for me, unless I could do the Thursday night in a soup kitchen somewhere. I’ve been offered it a couple of times and been like, ‘Nah’. It would’ve been in the middle of a tour and it just didn’t work out. But the festival itself is fucking amazing, I love it and I’ll be going next year.”
Congratulations on your BMI Award. Does the fact it’s for songwriting make it more meaningful to you?
“Yeah, because it’s such a personal thing. Have you ever read Isle Of Noises? This guy [Daniel Rachel] interviewed 30 British songwriters, from me to Ray Davies, about the process of songwriting and what’s fascinating about the book is there’s no hard and fast rules. Everybody’s got a different way of approaching it. So when you get an award for your songwriting, you’re asked to define it and I find it difficult because it’s such an instinctive thing to me. I’ve never received a musical lesson in my life, I’ve just got a fucking talent for getting a tune out of anything and the enthusiasm to see ideas through, and I really love what I do. But as for the actual how you do it, I don’t know. They fall out of the sky.”
But what usually comes first – the verse or chorus?
“The one constant is that the words will always come last. I’ll have arranged the entire song, then I’ll just wait for the words. The first line is usually the hardest and then they get progressively easier. Some songs can take 10 minutes to write; eight years is the longest I’ve ever spent on a song.”
Which song was that?
“It was off [2005’s] Don’t Believe The Truth... Let There Be Love. That took eight years to write. This Is The Place [took] four or five years because, ‘That bit didn’t work, I’ll have to write a new bit for that and then that bit worked’. But I find it difficult to talk about; it’s just something that’s always been there for me. I’ll have to get up and make a speech [at the BMI Awards] and no doubt I’ll fucking upset somebody while I do it, because I’ve got nothing to say [laughs].”
Have there been periods in your career where the songs just wouldn’t come?
“I’ve had it once where there was nothing happening, no matter what. And I remember [Paul] Weller saying, ‘Just don’t chase it’ and that was good advice. If you’re chasing it, you’re wasting your energy. I’ve never had it since I’ve left Oasis because I work at my own pace, there’s nothing coming up on the horizon where it’s got to be finished. There was that middle bit of Oasis: Be Here Now, Standing On The Shoulder Of Giants [2000], Heathen Chemistry [2002]... They were the years I was struggling. Looking back on it now, I was waiting for something to happen in the music business – something to come along that I could get behind.”
How overstated was The Beatles’ influence on your songwriting?
“Man, mental. It’s just because we were huge Beatles fans. I used to get embarrassed when I’d go to America and you’d sit with a journalist who’d say, ‘You’re supposed to sound like The Beatles’. And I’m like [shrugs]. I always thought we just sounded like a fucking rock band, do you know what I mean? But when you’ve got the singer constantly piping on about John Lennon and naming his kids after him, you’re asking for it really.”
Do you still see yourself doing this at Macca’s age?
“Seventy-seven? I guess I might have to go veggie if I’m going to be doing it at McCartney’s age. I can see me still writing and touring but, as opposed to an album every three years, it’d be an album every six. The way I look at it is, if you can do it, you’re obliged to do it. There’s enough shit in the world – bad, dark, mad shit – that if you’re a fucking artist and you’re sitting at home and not doing it, you’re a disgrace. You’ve got to get out there, man. You’re breaking the monotony of shitness for people.”
You’ve had plenty to say on co-writing, but did you know the average number of writers on the UK’s Top 100 hit singles last year was 5.34?
“Are you fucking kidding? Fucking hell. I don’t get it. But this is all major record label shit: two guys do the beats, another one does the topline, another does this, that and the other... And in that sense it’s the death of art, because there are no artists – there are just writers and performers. There’s a clear line now: you’re either an artist, or you’re an act. I go in the studio and create something from nothing, live and die by its merits and that’s it. Anyone else? Fuck those cunts, they’re non-existent in my world. I know for a fact that [some] solo artists, whose names are in the credits, haven’t done a fucking thing – they’re just in there because that’s in their contract. But I’m proud to be one of the last of a dying breed. The music business will eat itself eventually. Five people to write a song? If five people write a song, they should be in a band together. That’s why bands are dead.”
It is rare for a rock band to crack the Top 40 these days...
“If you’re an A&R guy, why are you going to take a punt on five kids from a council estate, who are all on drugs, who might eventually fucking write Cigarettes & Alcohol, when you’ve got this guy who’s just gagging to be in the music business? Some fucking post-Ed Sheeran dude with an acoustic guitar that you can see at any open mic night, singing songs about his dog leaving him, or his bird, or his fucking pigeon having a cough. And it gets a million hits on YouTube because he’s wearing odd socks. Are you going to take a risk on this band that might change the world? You’ve got your numbers to fucking make up mate, you’re going to take the easy way out.”
So are the days of mavericks like Alan McGee and Tony Wilson running labels a thing of the past?
“Yeah, but to be honest they all took the money. Tony didn’t, fair play, but Alan took the money. They all sold out in the end, so you can’t complain about it. I’m glad that I came through from a different era. Everything that’s cool used to be mainstream – Creation Records, Go! Discs, Factory. Everything that’s cool now is completely and utterly fucking minute, run out of a back room somewhere. There’s just a different mentality in the music business. It’s all geared towards the numbers – the numbers rule, the internet rules; it’s like every song now being three minutes and four seconds – the business is dictating what art should be. A friend sent me some demos of this kid. He’s a good lad with some good tunes, so I passed him on to a record label and he ended up getting a deal. And I said to him, ‘I’m only going to give you one bit of advice mate. When you get into that record label, they’ll listen to your songs and they will say this to you: “That’s fucking great... It’s not a single though. This is the guy that’s going to write a single for you”. You’ve got to resist that at all costs’.”
What’s your take on the huge rise in copyright cases since the Blurred Lines ruling?
“I’d never heard the Marvin Gaye song [Got To Give It Up] until the story came out. But then you listen to it and think, ‘Where’s the bit that they’ve copied?’ And you’re just like, ‘Man, if they’re copyrighting vibes, we are fucked. I’m completely fucked’. How do you lose that case? You can’t copyright a vibe! I had a producer say to me once that he wanted a credit and I replied, ‘What are you getting a credit for?’ And he said, ‘Well, for the vibe’ and I was like, ‘The vibe? You’re paid to bring the vibe you silly cunt!’ We never worked together again.”
Lastly, we know your stance on an Oasis reunion, but what’s your opinion on bands getting back together in general?
“I get it because nostalgia is a disease that’s taking over the world, because it’s in such a shit fucking place. I’m the same – I will gladly sit in on a Friday night and watch Top Of The Pops forever because there’s nothing on the telly apart from some shit on Netflix about zombies, talking dogs and vampires. I’m a bit nostalgic about TV and the ’80s because there’s nothing decent for me to get my teeth into nowadays. I understand The Stone Roses [reuniting], who never got paid. Other than that, it doesn’t appeal to me in any way. I just don’t see what on earth you’re getting out of it. I mean, if you’re skint, do it. Don’t lie about it though, just say you’re doing it for the fucking money! Money’s all right, it’s not a dirty thing. I love making money – the more I’ve got of it, the better. I guess it’s a personal thing: I don’t need the money; I don’t need the hassle; I don’t want to put the High Flying Birds on hold for two years to go around the world arguing with someone I don’t get on with, what’s the point in doing that? So it doesn’t appeal to me. If I ever lose all my money investing in fucking arms dealing somewhere in Chechnya and I’m skint, trust me, I’ll be the first at the press conference. But I won’t be lying about it, I’ll say I’m doing it for the fucking money.”
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2017.01.23 18:03 SC_Lumen Week in Review: January 16th - 22nd, 2017

NeuralCast ep. #13: Zero Asset Errors

Official Star Citizen News

Comm-Link

Concept Art

Development Updates

Gameplay Mechanics

Interviews

Lore

  • The NovaRiders are an in-game biker gang / pirate group
    • They would broadcast thrashmetal on all channels when they attacked so that a target couldn't send a message out for help above the noise
    • Their likeness was used in Arena Commander
    • They were destroyed by military intervention after they became too big of a nuisance

Merchandise

Ships

Miscellaneous Star Citizen News

Technical Overviews

Current Meta Discussion

Future Meta Discussion

Fan Projects

Have any questions about Star Citizen? Submit them here!
  • The NeuralCast team will do our best to answer your lingering questions about Star Citizen's gameplay, development, and lore!

Spoilers located here

Previous week review notes can be found here.

Brought to you by /CognitionCorp
submitted by SC_Lumen to starcitizen [link] [comments]


2017.01.22 18:52 SC_Lumen NeuralCast -- Jan 16th - 22nd Shownotes

NeuralCast ep. #13: Zero Asset Errors
NeuralCast Preshow ep #13 (Patrons Only)

Giveaways

Official Star Citizen News

Comm-Link

Concept Art

Development Updates

Gameplay Mechanics

Interviews

Lore

  • The NovaRiders are an in-game biker gang / pirate group
    • They would broadcast thrashmetal on all channels when they attacked so that a target couldn't send a message out for help above the noise
    • Their likeness was used in Arena Commander
    • They were destroyed by military intervention after they became too big of a nuisance

Merchandise

Ships

Miscellaneous Star Citizen News

Technical Overviews

Current Meta Discussion

Future Meta Discussion

Fan Projects

Have any questions about Star Citizen? Submit them here!
  • The NeuralCast team will do our best to answer your lingering questions about Star Citizen's gameplay, development, and lore!

Spoilers located here

Previous week review notes can be found here.

Brought to you by /CognitionCorp
submitted by SC_Lumen to CognitionCorp [link] [comments]


2014.08.13 00:38 tabledresser [Table] IAmA: I'm Watsky. Ask me anything.

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2014-08-12
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
How did you deal with your early shows' lighting with your epilepsy? Did it make you unable to do a lot of performances? I don't have epilepsy that's triggered by flashing lights. Many epileptics have no problems with lights, and all have different triggers. I have a mild case (I've had 4 gran mal seizures, separated in the middle by 14 years) and my trigger seems to be aerobic exercise/ long distance running. Some people are triggered by stress, dehydration, lack of sleep, alcohol, a combination of all those things, or nothing in particular. My seizures came back recently and it was a concern that a really intense stage show on Warped Tour in the sun all summer could be a problem. So I forfeited by driver's license, stopped drinking and I've stayed on a medication I don't particularly want to be on for the time being. More seizures could really throw my touring plans off, which would be a blow not just to myself, but to the whole crew I tour with, so I'm trying to play it safe and take good care of myself.
What were you thinking when you did that 35 foot stage dive that injured two people? Are you going to jump on me if I come to one of your shows? It was obviously very stupid, that goes without saying. Believe it or not, I thought the audience would catch me. I vastly underestimated how high the riser was and vastly overestimated the audience's desire to do the catching. It was driven by ego and wanting to feel badass, when in fact it was the opposite and I wish I could have that choice back. I started taking dangerous risks on stage and because I was getting away with them for a while-- I pushed the envelope way too far and a couple of innocent people paid the price. It was humiliating, and I'm sure will continue to be something I have to answer to, but all I can do is try and learn from it, be a more responsible performer, and do what I can to make it right with the folks who got hurt.
I saw you at your first show in London, it was absolutely amazing easily the best show I've ever been to, looking forward to seeing you in manchester. On to the question, as someone who's built their fame by releasing videos and giving out mix tapes for free do you think the album is dead or is there still a place for it? I believe in albums, because I like a piece of work that's more substantial than a single song as a representation of where an artist is in their life. I studied theater and I view an album like a play or a movie, in terms of giving it a structural backbone from song to song. Three act structure (aka beginning, middle, end) can be a really helpful way to look at building an album. You want to take people on an emotional trip. It has to lead somewhere and I really enjoy the process of building a project that way. In terms of physical albums, I think people will always find creative ways to have a tactile representation of an album, but CDs are pretty much obsolete already. I think sculptures that incorporate USB keys in creative ways could be a cool way to package a project.
Watsky! how do you handle criticism? When people say your music is lame or corny, what helps you shrug that off? Also come back to Albany with Wax we loved you guys. I gotta admit I occasionally lurk on HipHopHeads to see what brutally honest non-fans say about my shit. I think it's good to do that because the other side of the coin is only listening to the opinions of fans who love my material and are going to stroke my ego. And I can't get better if I'm only listening to the opinions of people who think my music is perfect (it's not). I have the luxury of getting positive reinforcement about my work all the time, so I like to see what people who think I suck have to say. Sometimes they articulate what they don't like about me really well, and if I take that with a grain of salt, I can learn from it.
How did the instant boom of "white kid raps fast" affect your popularity? Would you rather have been less well known but more recognized for your incredible lyricism and other works? I know this was a while ago, but that video is how I first heard of you, so I figured I'd ask. It was a blessing and a curse, and I would say 80% blessing, 20% curse. You might not know about my work if it weren't for that video, along with lots of other people. I worked really hard in the intervening years to try to not just churn out quick viral attention grabs, but to focus on trying to make good music and tour heavily. I feel really lucky to have had a break that got some exposure. Now I have an audience and it's on me to try to make good material. I'm sure there are still people who view me through that lens, but I'll be doing my best to change their minds. I had tons of poetry and music out before that video hit and no one was coming to my shows, so I've seen both sides.
Is that why you took the video down? To try to get past the "curse" aspect of it? Specifically because people who were finding out about me through my new work (and especially journalists), then searched me and saw a video with 24 million hits, saw that as my primary focus. The video's been reposted so many times that anyone who wants to watch it again can easily find it, but it's not framing the conversation for my new fans and people reviewing my new albums.
Hey Watsky thanks for doing this again. I was wondering if a specific event made you write Wounded Healer? My dad isn't very healthy and that song always gives me goosebumps because I'm always worrying about his health. My dad's best friend committed suicide a couple years ago. Both he and my dad are/were psychotherapists (specifically Jungian analysts) and committing suicide is a major taboo for therapists with active clients. So it was especially confusing and heartbreaking for my dad. Carl Jung (i.e. Jungian) has a plank of his theory about being a "Wounded Healer," which means that the therapist brings their own experiences and trauma into their relationship with a patient, and uses that to help inform their advice and empathy. I wrote the song about that experience paired with seeing my dad ,who I love a lot, get older.
Hey Watsky! I really like the cover for All You Can Do. What is the idea behind it? Also, who is the photographer and how did you meet? :) That's an honest-to-goodness photo of my dad that his girlfriend at the time took in 1971 when he was my age (27). The back cover is a picture of my mom from the same year. The album is a tribute to them in some ways and the era of music they grew up with and passed on to me. My folks both moved to San Francisco in the late 60s and I wanted to write an album that explored what it means to be raised by the hippy generation.
I'm not familiar with the material on your new album yet, but would you ever want to release an exclusively spoken word/poetry album? Tiny Glowing Screens Pt 2 was my favorite track on Cardboard Castles. Right on, the song "cannonball" on the new album is similar to that. i'm sure i'll do another exclusively poetry project at some point. either a printed collection or a record, but i feel like of all the things i love to do, music might be the one that values youth the most, so i'm trying to take advantage of the opportunity while i can. i hope to be writing as long as i'm breathing.
I have to say Watsky, when I first heard your music, I was pretty much stunned at your speed (Pale Kid Raps Fast) and at that time it seemed like somewhat of a gimmick. Obviously as I listened more and more to your music I became quickly drawn in by your lyrics and the meanings and depth behind each one. Safe to say I'm a huge fan (along with my brother and sister), already bought the album and I'm looking forward to seeing you in London in September! Now on to my question: As I am a hopeful musician studying at University and making my own stuff only recently, what would be your writing process when starting a new song and how would you go about getting your music out to a bigger audience? It's a combination of hard work, natural skill and good fortune. the only part of that equation you can control is hard work, although you have to work smart, and if you do, then skill can be improved. I really think when you're starting out it's good to take every opportunity to learn, meet likeminded folks, and expose your work. raise your hand every time, sign up for every open mic, and don't get discouraged if it doesn't work out at first. use the internet to your advantage and enjoy the process of writing and performing regardless of how many people are at the show. easier said than done, but that's the best I got.
Hey Watsky. I remember being at one of your shows in Lawrence and there was this super ornery and drunk chick that wouldn't shut up during your slam poetry. Your response to her was not only hilarious but extremely classy and actually really introspective. Have you had any other experiences like that on any of your tours? Haha, yeah I remember that. I got heckled pretty badly at a Lancaster, PA show by one of Wax's fans last year. I think there are usually ways to diffuse those situations. If you don't give into the bait and you give the heckler an "out"-- basically by letting them know the audience isn't on the heckler's side but you're not mad at them for being a dick, then it'll die down. It's never in your best interest to get flustered.
I’m huge fan of yours and Epic Rap Battles of History. I love when you’re on and as a Whovian I especially loved you as the 4th Doctor. So my questions are: What is the whole experience of working with EpicLLOYD and Nice Peter like? And do you guys collab on the lyrics, do you write them or just perform what they write? I love working with those guys. They actually let me write my own verses, much like Zach Sherwin does. It would be hard for me to rap something someone else wrote, because the delivery and the writing go hand in hand with each other. Zach pitched some of the punchlines that made it into the Poe one, and I was also in the writers' room pitching for the Dr. Who episode.
Who is your biggest idol that you have had a chance to meet and is aware of your work? What did they say? And who is your biggest idol you’ve yet to meet and converse with as a peer? I got to re-meet Gift of Gab from Blackalicious in Santa Cruz several years after he recorded a guest verse on my song Everything Turns Gold. It was really awesome that he remembered me and had been following me career. He's seriously an idol- one of my top 5 MCs and that was a real honor.
Hi Watsky, I'm Danielle. I've seen you multiple times, the first time being in Lyndonville, VT. I try to bring something special to each of your shows (cupcakes or handmade crafts) to give to you, and when I saw you at Warped you remembered my name :] What do you do with the gifts that your fans give to you? Do you have any favorites? I try to keep all of them unless they're physically too big to bring with us. I have a couple boxes of em and they make me really happy. A fan in upstate New York gave me a binder on Warped Tour of memories she collected from a bunch of other fans that really touched me. I also got an oak tree made out of colored wires in Germany last year that was really amazing.
Last updated: 2014-08-16 22:23 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
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  8. Tilted Kilt: Talk Flirty to Me - Sci Fi Speed Dating - YouTube
  9. Speed Dating (Legendado) - YouTube

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